2002 Grady-White Express 330 Freeport, NY
Posted on May 11, 2018 / 177
2002 Grady-White Express 330
Price : $108,888
Builder | Manufacturer : Grady-White
Condition : Used
Year : 2002
Length : 33ft
Model : Express 330
Hull Material : Fiberglass
Hull Warranty : 5 year
Fuel Type : Gas
Engine/s : Other
Engine Make : Yamaha
Engine Model : LF250TXR
Engine/s Year : 2007
Total Power : 500hp
Max Speed : 36 kn
Cruising Speed : 28 kn
Bridge Clearance : 9.83
LOA : 33'
Beam : 11.58
Displacement : 9500
Hull Type/Shape : Sea-V2
Dead Rise : 21
2002 Grady-White Express 330

Newer Engines, Grady Life For You and Crew

Your dream is now affordable.  This legendary Grady-White can be your reality now.  Fully Detailed in July, shows nice, clean and ready for you.  This is the model for safe and comfortable cruising and fishing.  True pedigree and the highest brand recognition for your ultimate value.  Enjoy 2007 Yamaha F250 engines, approximately 1,300 hours, Vetus bow thruster. Fischer Panda 4.2 kw diesel generator, full UPDATED electronics-Furuno Navnet GPS/radar, Simrad AP 16 auto pilot, Furuno FCV 582L sounder, ACR spotlight, NEW in 2013 ICOM M504 and M502 and windlass, NEW batteries 2016.  Air conditioning/heat, Vacuflush, Sony stereo, outriggers with updated supports and center rigger.  Cruise 28.1 knots at 4800 RPM.  Good survey in August 2012.

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Soundings Review August 22, 2007

Used Boat Review – Grady White 330 Express
Soundings EditorsAug 22, 2007

 

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Grady-White 330 Express
IN THEIR WORDS
As the saying goes, good things come to those who wait. And sometimes those things are boats.
As a youngster David Miko had to patiently work his paper route in Niantic, Conn., to save up the money for his first command. But it was worth it. The 16-foot skiff he bought with a little Merc outboard, he fondly recalls got him started on a lifetime of boating. His latest boat took a while to get, too.
 
But now that hes found it, the 56-year-old elementary school principal is as happy as that 10-year-old skipper fishing on NianticBay.
The boat he bought is a Grady-White 330 Express, hull No. 14 of the popular midcabin, twin-outboard model, which debuted in 2001 and is still in production. The boat was in good shape and needed only a hardtop repair, which was taken care of by the builder. The price was $155,000.
Its a boat hes had his eye on. Id been looking at the 33-footer for a number of years, since it first came out, in fact, says Miko, whos owned two other Grady-Whites, a 20- and a 23-footer. A few years ago I asked the salespeople at my dealership to keep their eye out for a good used one with 4-stroke engines. Well, one came around last year. It was in good shape, with the right power and the right price. It was, in todays parlance, a no-brainer.
Why the 330? More range and more room when measured against the 23-footer the bigger boat has replaced. When your passions involve serious Atlantic canyon fishing up to 100 miles off Montauk, N.Y., and a desire for comfortable family cruising, both of those factors are important, says Miko. The 23-footer could handle the canyons, but it could get a little [rough] out there, he says. And we just didnt have the range we really needed.

The creature comforts of the 330 Express well-appointed for overnighting are hard to compare to those of a 23-footer, says Miko, who cruises to Block Island, R.I., Greenport, N.Y., and other destinations around eastern Long Island Sound with his wife, Lisa. The 330 is large, with plenty of beam. It sleeps five and it has all the family amenities, he says. Theres an enclosed head, the microwave and stove, the TV, and plenty of room. All these things are appreciated by the family.
Miko and his fishing friends appreciate the boats fishability, which shows up in the little things, he says. The cockpit is 80 square feet, the beam is more than 11 feet, and theres a couple of inches more freeboard [than the smaller boat], he says. All these things add up.
The cockpit has room for a 314-quart fishbox, a 45-gallon live well, and a bait-and-tackle station. Mikos Grady has a set of 24-foot outriggers and a full slate of electronics, including a 10-inch GPS/plotter and a 48-nautical-mile radar. This boat is fully geared, he says. I need to get a better fishfinder and add a rocket launcher thats about it.
Power comes from a pair of 2-year-old 250-hp Yamaha 4-strokes for a cruising speed of around 25 to 30 mph and a top end close to 40 mph. I had a single 225-hp outboard on the 23-footer, and I like having two engines now. Its a safety plus, says Miko. Hes doubled his range to more than 400 miles, too, thanks to the 330s 350-gallon fuel supply. We were pushing it in the 23-footer, and we had to stop and fuel at Montauk, which t

Review by David Miko

Grady-White 330 Express: Used Boat Review
As the saying goes, good things come to those who wait. And sometimes those things are boats.
By Steve Knauth
April 19, 2012
As a youngster David Miko had to patiently work his paper route in Niantic, Conn., to save up the money for his first command. But it was worth it. The 16- foot skiff he bought with a little Merc outboard, he fondly recalls got him started on a lifetime of boating. His latest boat took a while to get, too. But now that hes found it, the 56-year-old elementary school principal is as happy as that 10-year-old skipper fishing on Niantic Bay.

David Miko’s Grady-White 330 Express is hull No. 14.

The boat he bought is a Grady-White 330 Express, hull No. 14 of the popular midcabin, twin-outboard model, which debuted in 2001 and is still in production. The boat was in good shape and needed only a hardtop repair, which was taken care of by the builder. The price was $155,000.

Its a boat hes had his eye on. Id been looking at the 33-footer for a number of years, since it first came out, in fact, says Miko, whos owned two other Grady- Whites, a 20- and a 23-footer. A few years ago I asked the salespeople at my dealership to keep their eye out for a good used one with 4-stroke engines. Well, one came around last year. It was in good shape, with the right power and the right price. It was, in todays parlance, a no-brainer.

Why the 330? More range and more room when measured against the 23-footer the bigger boat has replaced. When your passions involve serious Atlantic canyon fishing up to 100 miles off Montauk, N.Y., and a desire for comfortable family cruising, both of those factors are important, says Miko. The 23-footer could handle the canyons, but it could get a little [rough] out there, he says. And we just didnt have the range we really needed.

The creature comforts of the 330 Express well-appointed for overnighting are hard to compare to those of a 23-footer, says Miko, who cruises to Block Island, R.I., Greenport, N.Y., and other destinations around eastern Long Island Sound with his wife, Lisa. The 330 is large, with plenty of beam. It sleeps five and it has all the family amenities, he says. Theres an enclosed head, the microwave and stove, the TV, and plenty of room. All these things are appreciated by the family.

David Miko

Miko and his fishing friends appreciate the boats fishability, which shows up in the little things, he says. The cockpit is 80 square feet, the beam is more than 11 feet, and theres a couple of inches more freeboard [than the smaller boat], he says. All these things add up.

The cockpit has room for a 314-quart fishbox, a 45-gallon live well, and a baitand- tackle station. Mikos Grady has a set of 24-foot outriggers and a full slate of electronics, including a 10-inch GPS/plotter and a 48-nautical-mile radar. This boat is fully geared, he says. I need to get a better fishfinder and add a rocket launcher thats about it.

Power comes from a pair of 2-year-old 250-hp Yamaha 4-strokes for a cruising speed of around 25 to 30 mph and a top end close to 40 mph. I had a single 225- hp outboard on the 23-footer, and I like having two engines now. Its a safety plus, says Miko. Hes doubled his range to more than 400 miles, too, thanks to the 330s 350-gallon fuel supply. We were pushing it in the 23-footer, and we had to stop and fuel at Montauk, which took up fishing time. No more of that.

Miko plans a long relationship with the 330 Express. Its range, stability, fishability and comforts make it a good fishing-and-family boat, one

Yachting Review By Michael Verdon October 3, 2007

Grady-White 330 Express
Grady-White aims at anglers and their families with the flagship 330 Express.
By Michael Verdon October 3, 2007

0 Comments
In the overcrowded world of mid-range fishing boats, only a handful of center consoles and walkarounds are worthy of venturing into blue water, where life can depend on a boat’s inherent seaworthiness. Grady-White has earned a reputation for such quality over the years and is setting a new standard with the 330 Express.

The 330 Express is a departure for the North Carolina builder, whose center consoles and walkarounds range from 18 to 30 feet. The rest of the line, while claiming to accommodate both the fisherman and family, leans more toward fishing. The new flagship, on the other hand, is stocked with fishing amenities and creature comforts. It is an ideal boat for families looking to trade up in comfort without losing the ability to troll tuna all weekend.
An 11-foot, 7-inch beam allows for 80 square feet of cockpit for hooking and fighting big fish, and 3 feet of freeboard will keep every family member safely in the boat. Thick bolsters pad the cockpit’s edge, including the transom door. Easy-on-the-feet fiberglass toerails inside the gunwales will secure everyone on board.
Other thoughtful features include a 270-quart insulated fishbox; a 45-gallon live well with internal light; a bait-prep station with sink and insulated cooler; a rocket launcher on the hardtop; and a fold-down bench that turns the cockpit into an entertainment platform.
What you don’t see is just as impressive, including the lift-out stowage bin covered by a transom hatch. Under the bin are the batteries, dry but within instant reach. The cockpit sole is reinforced for a fighting chair and has a screwed-in hatch that allows full access to the aluminum gas tanks.

The 330 Express has a C. Raymond Hunt-designed Sea V2 hull, which Grady-White uses on all its models. It is shaped like a series of wedges that respond to different sea conditions and speeds. The flatter after section delivers good stability during trolling; at speed, the sharp bow entry cuts through head seas to provide a softer ride.
Our sea trial in barely rippling Beverly Harbor, Massachusetts, offered little opportunity to gauge the hull’s potential. However, the standard 225 hp Yamaha F225 outboards were so quiet that I turned the key twice without realizing they were running. They had us up and moving without the time lag often associated with four-strokes, and conversation was possible without raised voices.
The engines are designed for low exhaust emissions and excellent fuel economy, consuming only 2 gph at 1000 rpm. At a friendly cruise of 4000 rpm, at a speed of 24.5 mph, fuel consumption rises to 16.1 gph. If you spend eight hours cruising to the fishing grounds, then the rest of the time trolling, you should get more than 100 hours out of the 350-gallon fuel tank.

She handles nicely in turns and maneuvers like an inboard in tight quarters. The helm station has a standalone helm seat, a stainless wheel and starboard-side benches. A removable center cushion means you can sit facing backward or turn the area into a sunpad.
The helm is protected by a hardtop five people could fit under in a rain shower. A net that hangs beneath the hardtop provides handy stowage.
The most impressive part of the helm console is the pop-up electronics compartment that rises from the main console with the push of a button. The compartment allows for flush-mounted electronics that would be vulnerable if left in full view when the boat is docked. I thought the panel would obstruct the driver’s sight to the engine gauges, but I was wrong. Visibility of the console, and around the rest of the boat, is first-rate.
Most Grady-Whites tend to be Spartan belowdecks, but the 330 Express has a comfortable, tasteful cabin. Teak magazine racks are under ceiling-mounted rodholders; a Coria

Saltwater Sportsman Review By John Brownlee September 21, 2007

Grady White Express 330
Grady-White ups the ante with its latest design: a big, burly express with outboard power.
By John Brownlee September 21, 2007

Grady-White’s new 33-foot express model makes a big and bold statement about what we can expect from an outboard boat. It’s obviously large, but it also has beautiful lines, Grady’s usual level of fit-and-finish, and a surprising level of performance at many varied tasks.
The 330 was styled after the company’s successful 265 Express, introduced a couple of years ago. Both boats feature classic express boat styling, very spacious cockpits and roomy cabins down below that can actually accommodate families on real overnight missions. The 330, however, takes this concept to a scale that’s unusual in the world of outboard boats.

Giant Cockpit
The cockpit, for example, boasts 80 square feet of usable fishing room, and it comes with standard features like a transom door, coaming pads and lots of storage. The transom bulkhead contains a cavernous 270-quart fishbox that drains overboard and has a handy cutting board on top of its lid. A drop-in storage box to port holds loose stuff and lifts out for access to the oil tanks, which reside below it. The transom gate is to starboard, and the bulkhead features Grady’s innovative fold-up passenger seat along its forward edge.

Molded boxes at the forward end of the cockpit hold a 45-gallon live well to starboard, with a tackle-storage center beneath it. To port there’s an insulated drink box with storage below, as well as a fresh water sink. These types of units are not usually found on outboard boats.
The raised bridgedeck features a centerline helm station with Grady’s electronically operated electronics box that raises and lowers on electric rams. The gauges are arrayed above the box, and are visible at all times, since you can adjust the electronics to whatever height suits you. There are passenger seats to port and starboard, with a drink cooler located beneath the port seat. The 330 sports a large, wraparound windshield with side vents for fresh air, and a center windshield wiper with fresh water washers to clear away salt spray.

The cabin companionway is located to port of the helm, and leads to the galley. The galley has a stainless sink and Corian countertops, plus a microwave oven, refrigerator, an electric stove and lots of storage. The head is to starboard, and features a VacuFlush head, a sink and a shower. The cabin has teak and holly flooring, and a teak dinette table, once again items normally found on larger, inboard boats.
The 330 sleeps four with ease, two in the spacious vee-berth forward and two more in the aft double berth located beneath the bridgedeck. This innovative use of space is showing up on more and more boats these days, and the aft berth also excels as a storage space when you’re traveling, or if you don’t need the room for guests.
We attempted to take the 330 to the Bahamas from Palm Beach, Florida, for our test, but relentless 25-knot winds and ten-foot seas convinced us to alter our plans. Instead, we headed south to Islamorada, in the Keys, traveling along the South Florida coast in nasty, six- to eight-foot quartering seas. These were great, real-world test conditions, and the 330 rode through the slop with remarkable ease. It never pounded, kept spray to a minimum, and handled predictably and smoothly. It was a surprisingly comfortable ride, given the conditions.

¿ SPECIFICATIONS LOA: 35′ 10″ Beam: 11′ 7″ Draft: 21″ Fuel: 350 gals. Water: 50 gals. Hull weight: 9,500 lbs. Transom deadrise: 20′ Base price w/ twin 250-hp Yamaha outboards: $215,380

The only problem we encountered was some prop slippage when climbing up the faces of particularly large waves at low planing speeds. Outboard props don’t have much diameter and break loose easily when trying to push a heavy boat uphill. We were using thr

Yachting Magazine Review March 2014

Grady-White 330 Express

In the overcrowded world of mid-range fishing boats, only a handful of center consoles and walkarounds are worthy of venturing into blue water, where life can depend on a boats inherent seaworthiness. Grady-White has earned a reputation for such quality over the years and is setting a new standard with the 330 Express.
The 330 Express is a departure for the North Carolina builder, whose center consoles and walkarounds range from 18 to 30 feet. The rest of the line, while claiming to accommodate both the fisherman and family, leans more toward fishing. The new flagship, on the other hand, is stocked with fishing amenities and creature comforts. It is an ideal boat for families looking to trade up in comfort without losing the ability to troll tuna all weekend.

An 11-foot, 7-inch beam allows for 80 square feet of cockpit for hooking and fighting big fish, and 3 feet of freeboard will keep every family member safely in the boat. Thick bolsters pad the cockpits edge, including the transom door. Easy-on-the-feet fiberglass toerails inside the gunwales will secure everyone on board.
Other thoughtful features include a 270-quart insulated fishbox; a 45-gallon live well with internal light; a bait-prep station with sink and insulated cooler; a rocket launcher on the hardtop; and a fold-down bench that turns the cockpit into an entertainment platform.
What you dont see is just as impressive, including the lift-out stowage bin covered by a transom hatch. Under the bin are the batteries, dry but within instant reach. The cockpit sole is reinforced for a fighting chair and has a screwed-in hatch that allows full access to the aluminum gas tanks.

The 330 Express has a C. Raymond Hunt-designed Sea V2 hull, which Grady-White uses on all its models. It is shaped like a series of wedges that respond to different sea conditions and speeds. The flatter after section delivers good stability during trolling; at speed, the sharp bow entry cuts through head seas to provide a softer ride.
Our sea trial in barely rippling Beverly Harbor, Massachusetts, offered little opportunity to gauge the hulls potential. However, the standard 225 hp Yamaha F225 outboards were so quiet that I turned the key twice without realizing they were running. They had us up and moving without the time lag often associated with four-strokes, and conversation was possible without raised voices.
The engines are designed for low exhaust emissions and excellent fuel economy, consuming only 2 gph at 1000 rpm. At a friendly cruise of 4000 rpm, at a speed of 24.5 mph, fuel consumption rises to 16.1 gph. If you spend eight hours cruising to the fishing grounds, then the rest of the time trolling, you should get more than 100 hours out of the 350-gallon fuel tank.

She handles nicely in turns and maneuvers like an inboard in tight quarters. The helm station has a standalone helm seat, a stainless wheel and starboard-side benches. A removable center cushion means you can sit facing backward or turn the area into a sunpad.
The helm is protected by a hardtop five people could fit under in a rain shower. A net that hangs beneath the hardtop provides handy stowage.
The most impressive part of the helm console is the pop-up electronics compartment that rises from the main console with the push of a button. The compartment allows for flush-mounted electronics that would be vulnerable if left in full view when the boat is docked. I thought the panel would obstruct the drivers sight to the engine gauges, but I was wrong. Visibility of the console, and around the rest of the boat, is first-rate.

Most Grady-Whites tend to be Spartan belowdecks, but the 330 Express has a comfortable, tasteful cabin. Teak magazine racks are under ceiling-mounted rodholders; a Corian countertop surrounds a practical stainless-steel sink; and the head has more than 6 feet of head

Review

The Outer Banks of North Carolina is famous for rough inlets and heavy seas, and many boatbuilders’ bluewater reputations are born here. The mention of Oregon Inlet can send a shiver down the spine of any boater who has been through it, even on a good day.
Regardless of where they live and what kind of boat they own, many boaters can recollect a couple of days on an ocean that pushed, pulled, dropped, and twisted their boat like it was inside a washing machine, causing them to wonder, “What’s wrong with playing golf?” Yet I recently found out that it’s possible to be comfortable fishing on a 33-footer with the infamous Outer Banks on spin cycle–cresting six-, eight-, and occasional 10-foot seas–as long as you’re on a Grady-White Express 330.
It all started as I cruised down Route 64 to Ocracoke, North Carolina, with my fishing buddy and PMY’s Mid-Atlantic Sales representative David “Doughnuts” McGee, who noted during our drive that the wind was southwest at 20 mph and had been that way for several days. As I looked at the stiff-as-a-board American flag flying by the roadside, I should have had a feeling that this was going to be a memorable trip.
Arriving at the marina, McGee and I met our other partners for this trip, Joey Weller, customer relations manager and media representative for Grady-White, Steve Camp, southeast regional sales representative for Grady-White, and Dave Neese, director of engineering for Grady-White. The plan was to fish between 30 and 40 miles offshore, and since our boat test was during an annual Grady-White rendezvous, I knew we were going out whatever the conditions.
On day one we left the serenity of Ocracoke harbor around 7:30 a.m., and as we turned toward the inlet, I saw two walls of white water to either side of the channel markers. Weller was at the wheel as the 330’s standard twin 250-hp Yamaha outboards accelerated us to around 30 mph at 4000 rpm. (She would hit an average top speed of 41.9 mph at 5500 rpm during speed trials later in the day on the bay.)
Weller threaded the 330 through the markers as six-foot-plus head seas rolled toward us. I was impressed that I could sit on the port-side benchseat next to the center helm station in these conditions, and McGee, sitting on the starboard seat, actually seemed to be enjoying the ride.

Disclaimer
The Company offers the details of this vessel in good faith but cannot guarantee or warrant the accuracy of this information nor warrant the condition of the vessel. A buyer should instruct his agents, or his surveyors, to investigate such details as the buyer desires validated. This vessel is offered subject to prior sale, price change, or withdrawal without notice.

Equipment
GPS Plotter Radar Radio Autopilot VHF Compass Depthsounder Navigation Center Battery Charger Electric Bilge Pump Sea Water Pump Shore Power Inlet Cockpit Shower Cockpit Speakers Swimming Ladder Bow Thruster

Electric Head Hot Water Heating Air Conditioning Refrigerator Microwave Oven CD Player

Electric

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